Mathematics lesson and learning tools

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Latest updated: Quadratic Equation, Worksheet Generator - added multiplication and division of fractions, Probability - Bayes' Theorem, Matrix Calculators, Gauss-Jordan Elimination - automatically append Identity Matrix, Simultaneous Linear Equations, Probability: Bayes' Theorem, Significant Figures Calculator, Geometric Linear Transformation,

Mathematics News

» 'Smaller is smarter' in superspreading of influence in social network
Wed, 01 Jul 2015 18:58:57 EDT
A study by City College of New York physicists Flaviano Morone and Hernán A. Makse suggests that "smaller is smarter" when it comes to influential superspreaders of information in social networks. This is a major shift from the widely held view that "bigger is better," and could have important consequences for a broad range of social, natural and living networked systems.
» Stuck on you: Research shows fingerprint accuracy stays the same over time
Mon, 29 Jun 2015 16:47:41 EDT
Fingerprints have been used by law enforcement and forensics experts to successfully identify people for more than 100 years. Though fingerprints are assumed to be infallible personal identifiers, there has been little scientific research to prove this claim to be true. As such, there have been repeated challenges to the admissibility of fingerprint evidence in courts of law.

Provided courtesy of: Phys.org: Mathematics News
Phys.org provides the latest news on mathematics, math, math science, mathematical science and math technology.